How to choose an Acupuncturist

How to choose an Acupuncturist

How to choose an Acupuncturist What is a licensed acupuncturist? “A licensed acupuncturist has completed a three-year professional training program in acupuncture after a minimum of two years of college education. This three-year program includes both theory and hands-on clinical practice. In addition, a licensed acupuncturist must pass a State-approved licensing examination before becoming licensed.” says the office of professions but.. Don’t be fooled! It says 3 years of school forgetting to mention the word ACADEMIC years. What’s the difference? The difference is one whole year, because 1 academic year equals 16 months, and 16×3=48 which is the same as 12×4, and within these 4 years the licensed acupuncturist learns not only about needles, but all there is to know about the human body and how to treat it through over 2600 hours of in class training and earning a Master’s in Science of Acupuncture MSAc or Masters in Science of Traditional Oriental Medicine MSTOM. What is a certified acupuncturist? According to the office of professions “A certified acupuncturist is a licensed physician, chiropractor, physical therapist or dentist who has completed at least 200 hours of instruction in programs in acupuncture registered by the department, or in programs determined by the department to be the equivalent of registered programs, and at least 100 hours of supervised experience” Warning! Certification means the participants went through a brief training course, in some cases a mere weekend as opposed to a licensed acupuncturist with over 4 years in training (that’s if you’re doing the curriculum full time every semester with passing all the yearend exams without skipping a beat or taking off for...
Watermelon

Watermelon

Watermelon or it’s Chinese name Xi Gua Eating watermelon is a great way to stay cool and hydrated during hot weather. One cup of diced watermelon (152 grams) contains 43 calories, 0 grams of fat, 2 grams of sodium, 11 grams of carbs (including 9 grams of sugar) and 1 gram of fiber. One cup of watermelon will provide 17% of vitamin A, 21% of vitamin C, 2% of iron and 1% of Calcium needs for the day. Watermelon also contains thiamin, riboflavin, niacin, vitamin B-6, folate, pantothenic acid, magnesium, phosphorus, potassium, zinc, copper, manganese, selenium, choline, lycopene and betaine. According to the National Watermelon Promotion Board watermelon contains more lycopene than any other fruit or vegetable. Despite being a great source of the above nutrients, watermelon is made up of 92% water. In summer days the scorching sun may make some people feel a variety of symptoms like chest discomfort, low spirits, fatigue, weakness, dizziness, or just feeling thirsty and over heated. Sometimes these symptoms won’t go away if the hot weather continues. In fact, this series of symptoms are caused by the invasion of summer-heat and dampness, according to the theory of traditional Chinese medicine. Watermelon is the perfect for treating and preventing heat stroke or heat exhaustion in the summer. It is traditionally an important ingredient in treating mouth sores, sore throat, tooth infections and cavity pain. All of these conditions can be considered hot in nature. Other hot conditions such as burns, ulcerated sores, and ear infections can also be alleviated by watermelon. Although watermelon is considered extremely safe, it nevertheless should be avoided by people with excess dampness...